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Benefits of Decanting and Aerating Red Wine

welcome back youtubers um I’ve got a
bottle of my homemade Zinfandel today
I’m going to be opening up and this is a
really young wine this is from Chile in
2016 which brings me to my topic of
conversation which is just kind of
letting a young wine 3 the young red
wine green and the benefits of doing so
um and you have a couple ways to achieve
that the first way would just need to
pour it in your glass and let it sit for
I don’t know say an hour before you
drink it which works okay but you might
want to always have a couple glasses
lined up so that when you finish one
here on to the next one and you don’t do
wait a whole another hour to drink that
next wine the next way it’s something
that’s been around forever this is a
decanter pretty cool-looking shape and
these are really pretty fancy and nice
to have around and there’s a for this
one and here it’s going to take probably
about 45 minutes to an hour and a half
to really really open up and soften out
and smooth out so really really cool
especially if you can plant somewhat
ahead when you’re you know having people
over for wine who you’re just having
wine and then this is kind of a newer
thing these probably came on the market
about 10 years ago as far as I know and
this is a an aerator so this particular
one is from a company called Kathy K
assi by design and you can get these on
Amazon for pretty reasonable I think
between ten twenty dollars and what they
do is you can see you pour your wine
into this sort of funnel but it has the
two little tubes on the side which act
as they kind of use the venturi effect
to actually suck air into that wine and
maximize your air contact so here we’ll
pour it here and achieve what you would
achieve in a traditional decanter in
literally just seconds versus maybe an
hour you know and really really cool
actually something else you can do this
little secret trick is you could always
set this in the decanter if you wanted
to really get crazy but the whole reason
that you really want to open up a young
red wine like this is they’re gonna
usually have relatively harsh tannins
so it’s exposure to oxygen will kind of
help those tannins sort of oxidize and
turn some short-chain tannins and
there’s some smooth long-chain cans
which is a great thing to do and also
it’s going to just let sulfites that are
put into that wine to help protect it
it’ll kind of help those blow off so
there’s nothing really wrong with
sulfates but what they do is they’ll
sort of trap the aromas into a wine so
by maximizing the surface area of the
one this is essentially what you’re
doing in both of these cases you’re
really helping to more rapidly oxidize
those things that are naturally going to
want to oxidize so that being said
everyone knows in winemaking your enemy
is oxygen when you’re drinking wine it’s
actually your friend to some extent but
you know never leave it in a decanter
overnight because you’re gonna end up
with a line that smells like sherry
which is not what you want
also always test your wine before you
pour it through eventer air into a
decanter because if you have a really
really fancy old wine so you have some
Bordeaux from 20 years ago it could this
amount of air exposure could actually
oxidize that wine too
sent that you don’t want and and that’s
like really really rare but you really
hate to ruin a really good wine but I am
accidentally over aerating it but really
cool things to have laying around your
house it’s kind of nice to probably have
both this if you want to take it with
you to a hotel or something or whatever
and then this is just really kind of
cool to put on the shelf or just have it
as kind of a decorative a way to aerate
your wine both as I said kind of
essentially achieve the same thing but
one does it a little bit you know quite
a bit slower one does it more instantly
but once real cool and classy and one’s
just a really nice tool to have around
this song aerator I will match it does
have a little filter so it’s young wine
like I don’t think you really actually
need to use the filter something really
rare that you would ever do any sediment
or tartrate crystals and a young wine
but if you have a wine that um you know
maybe over five years old you might want
to throw the filter on or maybe give a
homemade wine that that you’re not
confident that it was crystal clear when
it was bottled but two really really
cool things to have in your house if
you’re you know into drinking red wines

Wine Aerators Buyers’ Guide

How long should wine breathe?

Wine can be aerated effectively by using a wine aerator. Aerating wine can help remove any unpleasant odors that arise from production, such as usage of unclean barrels. Wines with delicate flavors, such as rose, champagne, white wine, and sparkling drinks do not need to be aerated and are opened right before serving. The amount of time red wine needs to aerate really depends on the age of the wine, so make sure to look on the bottle. Young red wines, such as those under 8 years old, have a high amount of tannic acid and need to be aerated for 1-2 hours. Older and more mature red wines, generally those which are over 8 years old, are more toned-down and need to aerate for around 30 minutes maximum. Very old red wines do not need to be aerated.

What does a wine aerator do?

A wine aerator helps air enter the wine and lets the unpleasant odors escape. You will be surprised how such little oxygen will help make your wine taste significantly better. By allowing the contents of the wine to breathe, you are ensuring a more flavorful and smooth taste. Aerating and decanting wine will help highlight all the individual accents and smells, and you will taste the real thing. If you want to make a good impression on friends or neighbors during dinner by buying an expensive bottle of wine, the money will be wasted if you do not own an aerator. I recommend you buy an aerator and maybe even a decanter to get exactly what you are paying for in a bottle of wine.

How to aerate wine?

The most effective and expert-approved way to aerate wine is by using an aerator. There are two main types of aerators, handheld aerator, and aerator pourer. Using a handheld aerator, start by placing the filter over the aerator. This will help you avoid sediments and cork bits falling into the aerator. After choosing your wine and glass, position the wine glass on a steady surface. Then position and hold the wine aerator over your glass, without blocking the air holes. Hold the spout of the aerator just below the wine glass rim and pour the wine slowly into the aerator. Using an aerator pourer, start by affixing the aerator to the bottle after uncorking it. Then, once it is in place, pour the wine very slowly into a glass. Once finished pouring, seal the wine bottle using a cork.

How long can wine stay in a decanter?

Decanting wine helps separate the wine from the sediment, which ensures a flavorful taste and makes the wine look better in a glass. If you decant slowly and properly, the sediment will stay in the bottle and a clear liquid will be in the decanter. It also helps aerate the wine as you pour it into the decanter, unlocking more aromas. White wines do not need to be decanted, as they are already highly aromatic. Zinfandel and Pinot Noir wines need to be decanted for approximately 30 minutes. Malbec and Grenache Blends require 1 hour of decanting. Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Petite Sirah, Tempranillo, Sangiovese, and Vintage Port & Madeira need to be decanted for 2 hours. Mourvèdre/Monastrell, Dão and Douro, Syrah/Shiraz reds can be left in the decanter for 3 hours. The amount of time you should decant depends on the age of the red wine, so you can determine it according to these examples.

A product price updated on 2020-04-06 / Disclaimer: as an Amazon Associate a Skillet Director team earns from qualifying purchases.

Author: Mark Miller

I have graduated The Culinary Institute of America in 2013 and became a chef assistant in one of New York city restaurants. I began to move up the career ladder – just a few years later I've worked as a chef in a 4* restaurant.