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Homwe Extra Long Professional Silicone Oven Mitt, Oven Mitts with Quilted Liner, Heat Resistant Oven Gloves, Red, 1 Pair reviewed by Skillet Director
Grill Armor Extreme Heat Resistant Oven Gloves - EN407 Certified 500C - Cooking Gloves for BBQ, Grilling, Baking, Grey reviewed by Skillet Director
Ove Glove HH501-18 Hot Surface Handler Oven Mitt Glove, Perfect for Kitchen/Grilling, 540 Degree Resistance, As Seen On TV Household Gift, Heat & Flame reviewed by Skillet Director
Fred and Friends Oven Mitts Bear, Hands - 5130360 reviewed by Skillet Director
Heat Guardian Heat Resistant Gloves – Protective Gloves Withstand Heat Up To 932℉ – Use As Oven Mitts, Pot Holders, Heat Resistant Gloves for Grilling – Features 5” Cuff for Forearm Protection reviewed by Skillet Director
Title
Homwe Extra Long Professional Silicone Oven Mitts
Grill Armor Extreme Heat Resistant Oven Gloves
Ove Glove HH501-18 Hot Surface Handler Oven Mitt Glove
Fred and Friends Oven Mitts Bear
Heat Guardian Heat Resistant Gloves
Brand
HOMWE
Grill Armor Gloves
Ove Glove
Fred & Friends
Heat Guardian
Prime Benefits
-
Price
$13.97
$25.95
$21.32
$20.20
$16.98
Preview
Homwe Extra Long Professional Silicone Oven Mitt, Oven Mitts with Quilted Liner, Heat Resistant Oven Gloves, Red, 1 Pair reviewed by Skillet Director
Title
Homwe Extra Long Professional Silicone Oven Mitts
Brand
HOMWE
Prime Benefits
Price
$13.97
Checkout
Preview
Grill Armor Extreme Heat Resistant Oven Gloves - EN407 Certified 500C - Cooking Gloves for BBQ, Grilling, Baking, Grey reviewed by Skillet Director
Title
Grill Armor Extreme Heat Resistant Oven Gloves
Brand
Grill Armor Gloves
Prime Benefits
Price
$25.95
Checkout
Preview
Ove Glove HH501-18 Hot Surface Handler Oven Mitt Glove, Perfect for Kitchen/Grilling, 540 Degree Resistance, As Seen On TV Household Gift, Heat & Flame reviewed by Skillet Director
Title
Ove Glove HH501-18 Hot Surface Handler Oven Mitt Glove
Brand
Ove Glove
Prime Benefits
-
Price
$21.32
Checkout
Preview
Fred and Friends Oven Mitts Bear, Hands - 5130360 reviewed by Skillet Director
Title
Fred and Friends Oven Mitts Bear
Brand
Fred & Friends
Prime Benefits
Price
$20.20
Checkout
Preview
Heat Guardian Heat Resistant Gloves – Protective Gloves Withstand Heat Up To 932℉ – Use As Oven Mitts, Pot Holders, Heat Resistant Gloves for Grilling – Features 5” Cuff for Forearm Protection reviewed by Skillet Director
Title
Heat Guardian Heat Resistant Gloves
Brand
Heat Guardian
Prime Benefits
Price
$16.98
Checkout

How to Make an Oven Mitt?

hey it’s Vanessa the crafty Gemini I
post weekly videos right here on my
youtube channel and in this video I’m
going to teach you how to make quilted
oven mitts
so first thing we need to do is come up
with our pattern you can trace an old
oven mitt you have or you can use this
free pattern that I’ve provided for you
the link is in the description box below
now because I tried to get it to fit
onto one page you are going to need to
make an adjustment it’s real simple and
all it is is you need to add two more
inches here so we need a little bit more
length I cut a strip of my cardstock
here to two inches and I’m just going to
stick it right there from that line down
make sure if you’re using my PDF pattern
that you’re printing it to size at a
hundred percent and not fit to page
otherwise you’re going to end up with a
smaller one so I’m taping this here and
all you’re going to do is kind of just
drag that line straight down you can
eyeball it all right and so that is now
the finished pattern with these two
inches added so go ahead and cut out
your pattern alright
so now once we have our finished pattern
cut out we need two different fabrics
you’re going to have one that’s going to
be for the outside okay and then another
one for your lining so go ahead and
select your fabrics and I’m going to cut
out here my lining first just to show
you and you’re going to repeat this
process both for the lining fabric and
for the outer fabric I have it folded
here so I can cut two pieces at once and
so what you want to do is you can have
it fold it either way this one is with
wrong sides of the fabric touching or
you can do it right sides all you want
to do is make sure that you end up with
two pieces that are opposites of each
other so let me show you here I’ve cut
out my pieces already for the outer
fabric so notice how I have the thumb
going this way and the thumb going this
way with the pretty sides of the fabric
facing up so you want to end up with
opposites so you can cut it like this
fold your fabric pretty sides touching
and cut it out once and you’ll end up
with the two pieces that you need
alright so we’re going to repeat that to
the outer fabric and the lining fabric
so my outer fabric is already cut now
let me go ahead and repeat that here for
my lining fabric I’m going to lay some
pattern weights on here and I can do
this freehand with a rotary cutter but
if you don’t feel comfortable go ahead
and just use your scissors as well and
for tighter curves I like to use a
smaller rotary cutter instead of my big
one
or am i here okay and now I have my two
lining pieces all right so we’re going
to set those with pretty sides of the
fabric touching so pretty too pretty and
just set them aside for now since we
repeated that already with our outer
fabric you’re going to take the outer
fabric and lay it on top of some insole
bright or some other type of insulated
batting that usually on the packaging it
will say that it’s good to use for oven
mitts it has this reflective stuff on it
and if you can see that too good on
camera but it kind of has like a sheen
to it that side that’s shinier that has
more of the metallic look to it is the
one that you want to put with the wrong
side of the fabric right so this is more
matte looking that should be away from
your fabric you want to have the
reflective side or the shinier more
metallic looking side to the back of
your fabric because we want to have that
reflective side being towards what
whatever the hot stuff is that you’re
grabbing so it can reflect the heat back
onto the heat source so I’ve cut out
pieces just slightly bigger than my
fabric pieces here and we’re going to
head over to the sewing machine and
we’re going to quilt this here is a
couple samples and you can mark lines
but I kind of like to go for a more
freeform look like these just random
lines in all kinds of directions you
don’t have to know how to free motion
quilt and you can just do random lines
and I’ll show you how I do that so you
can see that there’s really no rhyme or
reason to how I’m stitching this you can
mark out lines if you want to but I
think it’s a lot more fun and more
freeing to just do really random stitch
lines all over the place it doesn’t
matter it doesn’t have to be perfect we
just want the fabric to stick to the
insel bright material
so let me just show you the backside
here after I’ve done I’m done stitching
both of these mitts to the insula bright
you can see that they’re just really
random stitch lines I did a darker color
of thread in the bobbin just so it can
stand out on camera just feel free to
just go crazy and be free with your
stitching now we’re going to cut all the
way around this you can use scissors
again if you’re not comfortable doing
this freehand with the rotary cutter
once you have your two pieces together
lay them with the pretty sides of the
fabric touching and now because the
fabric is a little bit bulky I like to
use these clips and I’ll include a link
in the description box below where you
can get them these really are my
favorite for quilt binding or for
clipping chunky layers of fabric like
this project where the pins are a little
bit too tight to kind of get in there
and go through all these layers
so I’ve stitched all the way around and
let me show you here because I have a
darker thread color back here on this
little part make sure that you’re still
leaving yourself enough space don’t get
too tight on there you’re going to need
some space so that you can clip in here
to kind of separate that otherwise it’s
going to be too stiff and so what you
want to do is clip in with your scissors
just make a few Clips here as close as
you can get to that stitch line without
cutting into it and you can see that
that loosens up the fabric a little bit
more so that when you’re using it you
can move your hand better okay and it’s
going to help the fabric drape around it
easier once we flip this inside out as
well now if you have pinking shears go
ahead and use them to go around the
curves alright if you don’t have pinking
shears go ahead and just cut some
notches into it with your with your pair
of scissors and that will work fine as
well
this is reducing some bulk and allowing
that curve to expand alright now this
part is done we’re going to repeat the
same thing to the lining but you’re
going to leave an opening in the lining
so here’s what I did here I took my two
lining pieces laid them pretty sides
touching and then I took it to my sewing
machine and stitched all the way around
the same way we did with the actual mid
part except that I left about a three
three and a half inch opening on one end
so you have to leave an opening in your
lining to flip the whole thing right
side up alright so after we stitched
then we’re going to go back and do the
same thing we did to the other one and
make those notches and clips whatever
you’re going to do loosen that up a
little bit and with the pinking shears
now we have both of our pieces we’re
almost done but we need to make one more
thing and that’s the loop if you want to
if you don’t want to have a loop you can
make one just like this no problem if
you do want to add the loop here is what
you need to do we have a piece of fabric
here two and a half inches by five
inches and we’re going to fold it up and
stitch it I’m going to lay the pretty
side of the fabric face down and fold
this up lengthwise and press that crease
line there
then you want to open it and bring in
the top and bottom edges towards that
crease line as well and once you’ve done
that refold it on the initial crease and
press that you can put some pins if you
want to we’re going to stitch that down
and stitch it closed and I already have
a sample here that’s been stitched into
place for the assembly part you should
have your lining piece the outer and
then our loop what we’re going to do
here is reach in to the outer part and
flip the whole thing right side out so
I’ll reach in here and notice my lining
is with the ugly side or the wrong side
of the fabric facing up you should leave
it like that you want the outer part of
your mint to be touching the right side
of the lining fabric so I’m just going
to reach into this one may seem a little
awkward but trust me it works
reach in here and slip it right into
position like this okay and once you do
that you’ll see that the top raw edges
here should match if they don’t just
kind of tug it a little bit to make them
reach we’ll take our clips here and just
put a couple and now we’re going to add
our loop in between these layers so
here’s the sum we want it to come out
the backside here alright so on the side
that has the big curve that’s where you
want to insert it I’m going to fold it
in half and insert it with the loop in
right at this seam line here in between
the lining and the outer part of the
mint
so just slip it right there real simple
and I’ll put a clip through all these
layers so I know it’s not going to move
on me
put a few more clips if you need to and
then all you have to do is stitch all
the way around this opening here so
because the opening of the mitt is a
little bit tight even if you expose the
free arm on your sewing machine you’re
probably still going to have a tough
time doing it so instead I prefer to use
a technique that I’m showing you right
here where I start off on the inside and
I’m stitching along the inside edge and
I just roll the fabric or roll them into
the opening towards me as I run it
through the sewing machine so I’ll show
you here a little bit slower so you can
see exactly how I’m rotating the cuff
part to get it to stitch all the way
around that opening so once that’s
stitched
go here to your opening in your lining
and carefully flip everything out now it
looks a little crazy but don’t worry
it’s going to work out fine bring it
over here to the pressing surface and
our opening here you want to turn these
raw edges in and press them and you can
hand stitch it I would just machine
stitch it in place because it’s going to
be inside the mitt anyways nobody’s ever
going to see that well give it a nice
little press make sure you have all
those curves out and now what you got to
do after you stitch that into place
right stitch the opening shut first but
I’m just going to show you here how
you’re going to finish it off once
that’s done then you just push the
lining inside and feel in there with
your fingers fix everything up the thumb
sometimes is a little tricky
okay and once you have everything in
place inside your mitt you can see we
don’t have to add any binding or
anything to the top our little loop is
in place and you can make the loop
longer if you want to as well I just
take it over here to my ironing board
and give it a good press push it so that
the lining is rolled in towards the
inside and just give the whole thing a
nice press and there is your finished
quilted oven mitt so that’s it I hope
you enjoyed this video tutorial and saw
how easy it is to whip up these little
quilted oven mitts I hope you’ll give
this project a try if you do remember to
upload pictures to my facebook page
because I love to see what you’re out
there making from my tutorials thanks
again for watching
don’t forget to click the subscribe
button so you won’t miss out on any of
my future videos and I’ll see you all
next time

Oven Mitts Buyers’ Guide

What are oven mitts made of?

The material of the oven mitt is of great importance since it defines how much heat reaches your hands. Mitts made of varying materials can withstand up to 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Some types of mitts have silicone covers, and others also include cotton lining. Fabric gloves consist of heat insulation surrounded by cotton fabric, usually covered with decorative patterns. Most of them are made of cotton lining from the inside and durable cover of either silicone or resistant fiber from the outside. Silicone shells not only withstand heat but are also waterproof and oil proof. The outer cover can also be woven with fiber that is often used to make clothing for firefighters (Kevlar & DuPont Nomex). Some other types also include mitts with special longer lining that ensures the protection of forearms not to let heat reach the wrist.

How do oven mitts work?

The whole purpose of oven mitts is to keep the low conduction of heat. Therefore, oven mitts, as well as oven gloves, are all dry. Why do you need to have dry mitts, when water is thought to cool down the heat. Isn’t it logical to have damp or wet mitts? No, because wet gloves are more likely to conduct heat. While some people might assume that cold and wet mitts can be more useful in keeping hands cool, and fighting the heat, in fact, they make it even more dangerous, since water makes the heat travel to arms faster, while to avoid that, mitts are made from those materials that ensure low conduction of heat.

How to make oven mitts?

There are several ingredients you have to purchase to be able to make your own mitt. You will need exterior and lining fabric, Insulated batting, and Double-wide tape. With the first step, you should combine some of the fabric in layers. Right side down should be the lining fabric, then insulated batting goes side up, finally, exterior fabric should be attached right side up, and here you got a layer of all the fabric you need. Fix them with pins to get rid of the wrinkles and get ready to run it under the sewing machine. Remember that you need to have two such sandwiches for both sides of your mitt. So, repeat the same for the layers of fabric for the other side. Finally, take both already quilted sides of the mitt and place them over each other. Take a template and put it over the top of the two layers. Mark the edges of the template and then sew according to the marks you’ve made. Once you have sewn the layers together, remove all the pins, turn it inside out, and press it well with iron. That’s it. Your mitt is ready!

A product price updated on 2020-04-07 / Disclaimer: as an Amazon Associate a Skillet Director team earns from qualifying purchases.

Author: Emily Howard

I have about 300 different recipes in my collection, and I try to look for new tastes every week. I love to learn dishes from around the world and pamper my big family with a signature Italian cheese pie and my favorite Ukrainian borsch.